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Wednesday, 26 August 2015

Trends in hospitalised injury Australia: 1999-00 to 2012-13 (AIHW)

Trends in hospitalised injury Australia: 1999-00 to 2012-13 shows that the rate of injury hospitalised cases in Australia rose from 1999-00 to 2012-13 by an average of 1% per year. In 2012-13, case numbers and rates were higher for males than females for all age groups to 60-64, and higher for females for age groups 65-69 and older.

View the Media release and download the Full report.

Thursday, 20 August 2015

Australia's welfare 2015 (AIHW)

Australia's welfare 2015 is the 12th biennial welfare report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This comprehensive report provides an authoritative overview of the wellbeing of Australians, examining a wide range of relevant topics.

This edition combines analytical feature articles on a variety of contemporary welfare issues with short statistical snapshots following a life-course approach. It covers: Understanding welfare; Australia's welfare spending and workforce; Child wellbeing; Young people; Working age; Growing older; Diversity and disadvantage in Australia; Indicators of Australia's welfare.

View the Media release and download the Full report for free online.

The main report is accompanied by Australia's welfare 2015-in brief: a summary report presenting highlights from Australia's welfare 2015 .

Wednesday, 19 August 2015

Nursing and midwifery workforce 2014 (AIHW)

Nursing and midwifery workforce 2014 a web report by the Australian Institute of Health & Welfare, outlines the workforce characteristics of nurses and midwives in 2014. The total number of all nurses and midwives registered in Australia increased from 330,680 in 2011 to 352,838 in 2014 (6.7%).

In 2014, 91.7% of all registered nurses and midwives were in the nursing and midwifery workforce (323,711). Of these, 9,110 were looking for work in nursing and midwifery, up from 8,151 in 2013. In 2014 the overall supply of employed nurses and midwives was 1,134 full-time equivalents or FTEs for every 100,000 people. This compares with the figure of 1,107 FTEs per 100,000 in 2011. In 2011 and 2014, there were more employed nurses and midwives in the 50-54 year age group than any other age group. The proportion aged 50 and over grew from 38.3% to 39.4%.

View the Media release and Web pages.

Tuesday, 11 August 2015

The mental health of children and adolescents: report on the second Australian child and adolescent survey of mental health and wellbeing

The mental health of children and adolescents: report on the second Australian child and adolescent survey of mental health and wellbeing is a report based on a survey conducted in the homes of over 6,300 families with children and/or adolescents aged 4 to 17 years, and presents a comprehensive picture of the mental health of young Australians.

It documents the prevalence and type of mental health problems, the impact of those problems on families and young people themselves and the role of health and education services in providing assistance. While the primary sources of information were parents and carers, the survey also engaged directly with young people 11 years and older who completed their own survey. This information provides unique insights about aspects of their emotional lives and behaviour that are generally not visible to parents and carers.

Proposed Suicide Prevention Network for NSW

The number of suicides in NSW might potentially be reduced by as much as 20%, if all strategies known to be effective were implemented simultaneously, said NSW Mental Health Commissioner, John Feneley, today.

"There is abundant evidence about what works to prevent suicide, but it is often patchily implemented," Mr Feneley said. "By combining these proven strategies within an overarching systems approach, we believe we may have a chance to amplify their effect and make a dramatic difference to the number of lives lost."

Mr Feneley was commenting on the launch of the Proposed Suicide Prevention Framework for NSW, developed by the National Health and Medical Research Council's Centre of Research Excellence in Suicide Prevention with the Black Dog Institute.

The researchers, led by Professor Helen Christensen, identified 9 strategies that could be applied in parallel at a local or regional level to reduce the number of completed suicides. They are:

  1. Reducing access to lethal means
  2. Responsible reporting of suicide by the media
  3. Promotion of national suicide awareness programs
  4. School-based peer support and mental health literacy
  5. Gatekeeper training for those like to be in contact with high risk individuals, including teachers, clergy, and community social workers
  6. Regular suicide prevention training for emergency services
  7. Training GPs to assess risk and start conversations
  8. Adequate access to tailored evidence-based therapies such as cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) to high risk groups
  9. Targeted support for people who have made a previous attempt or are in current crisis through phone and online counselling, training for emergency department staff and out-patient support.

The Proposed Framework,responds to a key Action (3.4.2) within Living Well: A Strategic Plan for Mental Health in NSW 2014-2024, adopted as the Government's mental health reform policy in December 2014.

Monday, 10 August 2015

We need to move beyond the medical model to address Indigenous suicide

Despite efforts to prevent suicide among Indigenous Australians, especially the young, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suicide rate is at least twice as high as – and in some instances, such as at Mowanjum near Derby, 100 times the national rate.

We have an array of prevention agencies, lifeline programs and public mantras about “being in life”. So why don’t they seem to work in rural and remote communities?The obvious – but always avoided – response is that we don’t know why people, particularly young people, take their lives.

We can’t get to the soul of the suicide. And prevention is a somewhat pretentious term: suicide isn’t measles or smallpox and there are neither overt symptoms nor vaccinations to hand.

See more at: http://theconversation.com/we-need-to-move-beyond-the-medical-model-to-address-indigenous-suicide-44652

Nearly half of all patients hospitalised after suicide attempt receive no follow-up mental health treatment, research shows

40% of patients admitted to hospital after a suicide attempt do not receive any follow-up mental health treatment and only 10% receive specialist in-patient psychiatric care, new research shows.

Every year, more than 60,000 Australians attempt to take their life and the majority of these people will be taken to a hospital setting.

Research by the Black Dog Institute shows, of the patients who do receive follow-up mental health care following a suicide attempt, more than half receive one 30-minute session.

See more at: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-08-08/suicide-attempts-follow-up-inadequate-in-patients-research-says/6683128

Thursday, 6 August 2015

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and dementia: a review of the research

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and dementia: a review of the research outlines the prevalence of dementia and modifiable risk factors in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience dementia at an earlier age then the general population and this, combined with the steadily growing number of older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, will result in the number of people effected by dementia growing significantly in the coming years.

Although higher rates of dementia have been reported in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, the disease is often overlooked by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, health workers and service providers. Geographical constraints in the provision of services, a lack of education and awareness in communities and by health workers and the prevalence of other chronic diseases have all posed considerable barriers to the recognition of dementia as an emerging health issue.

This paper includes recommendations to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, family members and communities have access to awareness, information, and appropriate support services for people with dementia.

Workshop report : Addressing Dementia in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities

Other Alzheimer's Australia Indigenous dementia resources

Genetics Home Reference

Genetics Home Reference is the National Library of Medicine's web site for consumer information about genetic conditions and the genes or chromosomes related to those conditions.

The website includes Condition Summaries, Gene Summaries, Gene Family Summaries, Chromosome Summaries and a resources section providing links to other online resources based on users ie families, researchers or health professionals.

Genetics Home Reference also provides a free printable version of the entire Handbook, complete with illustrations. One of the latest additions to the site is Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis.

Reposted from: HealthInfo Blog.

Cultural competency in the delivery of health services for Indigenous people (AIHW)

Cultural competency in the delivery of health services for Indigenous people examines the available evidence on cultural competence in international and local literature.

It defines cultural competency; reports on available evidence; identifies approaches and strategies that are effective in improving cultural competency among health services staff, examines the relationship between cultural competency and health outcomes, and documents an evidence-informed conceptual framework.

Tuesday, 4 August 2015

Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: first national report 2015 (AIHW)

Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: first national report 2015 is the first national report on the 21 Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

It shows that: the age-standardised death rate due to cardiac conditions for Indigenous people was 1.6 times that for non-Indigenous people; mortality from cardiac conditions for Indigenous Australians decreased by 41% between 1998 and 2012, while access to cardiac care has improved over time.

Media release

Monday, 3 August 2015

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Alcohol and Other Drugs Workers' portal

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Alcohol and Other Drugs Workers' portal provides information on alcohol and other drug use, including tips for workers, practical tools for assessment and treatment, health promotion resources, publications and programs.

Friday, 31 July 2015

Suicide and suicidal behaviour in women

Suicide Prevention Australia has just published a report which looks at the data relating to suicide and suicidal behaviour in women. Suicide and suicidal behaviour in women – issues and prevention outlines the risk factors, the impact of attitudes about gender and the policy environment.

The key findings include the fact that women have higher rates of suicidal behaviour than men - that includes planning and attempting suicide. In 2013, 637 women died by suicide in Australia, and it especially effects younger women, and where there has been a reduction in suicides for young men since the 1990's, this has not been the case for young women.

Hanging is the most commonly used method of suicide for women (as it is for men) with poisoning by drugs being second most common. The number of women aged 15 - 24 years who injured themselves so severely that they require hospital treatment has increased by more than 50 per cent since 2000. The issue of self-injury is discussed as an important indicator for women's health.

Tuesday, 28 July 2015

Medical Research and Rural Health – Garvan Report 2015

Medical Research and Rural Health – Garvan Report 2015, the first in a series of Garvan Institute health reports, provides an up-to-date insight into the main health issues facing rural and regional communities today; who in those communities are affected; why the challenges exist and what is the outlook and way forward in starting to rectify some of these major health issues.

Examining health in line with the National Priority Health Areas,

• there is a 40% higher death rate in remote areas than in major cities

• life expectancy is 2.5 years lower for males and 1.3 years lower for females for outer regional, remote and very remote areas compared with major cities and inner regional areas
• 5-year relative survival for cancer decreases with increasing remoteness
• diabetes ranks higher as a cause of death among people living in remote and very remote areas compared with regional and major city areas
• the prevalence of asthma is significantly higher in people living in inner regional areas compared with those living in major cities or outer regional and remote areas
• adults living in outer regional and remote areas of Australia are more likely to be overweight or obese(69.5%) compared with adults living in major cities (60.2%).

Press release

Rural health poorer than in cities: report

Antimicrobial prescribing practice in Australian hospitals: Results of the 2014 National Antimicrobial Prescribing Survey

The latest report on antimicrobial prescribing practices provides important information about the rate and appropriateness of antimicrobial use in Australian hospitals.

The report, National Antimicrobial Prescribing Practice: results of the 2014 National Antimicrobial Prescribing Survey (NAPS), was released by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care and the National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship (NCAS) at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity.

The 2014 report summarises the results of a voluntary annual audit of 248 hospitals (197 public and 51 private) from across Australia. This resulted in a data set of almost 20,000 prescriptions.

The report shows:

  • Approximately one-quarter (24.3%) of the 19,944 prescriptions surveyed were non-compliant with guidelines, and 23% were deemed to be inappropriate.
  • Only 74% of antimicrobials prescribed had their indications documented in the medical notes (more than 95% is considered best practice).
  • Surgical prophylaxis continues to be an issue with 35.9% of the survey prescriptions continuing beyond 24 hours (less than 5% is considered best practice). 2% of prescriptions for surgical prophylaxis were also considered inappropriate, mainly due to incorrect duration and dose, and absence of an indication for an antimicrobial.
  • Infective exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was poorly prescribed (36.8% were deemed inappropriate), as were other respiratory tract infections such as bronchitis (50.7% inappropriate) and exacerbation of asthma (70.0% inappropriate).
  • The most common prescribed antimicrobials were cephazolin, ceftriaxone and metronidazole.

Antimicrobial prescribing practice in Australian hospitals: Results of the 2014 National Antimicrobial Prescribing Survey (Report)

Press Release